No Consents Required

One of the hardest and most complex parts of building or renovating is the consent process and dealing with the council, but there has been some exciting news for homeowners in late 2020.

Recent changes mean that low-risk building work, such as sheds, carports and sleepouts, in many cases no longer need council consent to be built.   

So if you’re considering a new addition to your home or property, it’s important to note that in a majority of cases, for the new building work not to require Council consent, these must be built by a manufacturer like KiwiSpan, or a licensed builder. With that in mind here are some options that no longer require Council consent;

  1.       Buildings up to a maximum floor area of 30 metres –  (these still can be built by non-professionals but require restrictions on building materials in accordance with the Building Code) 
  2.       Ground Floor Veranda’s or Awnings up to 30 metres
  3.       Carports up to 40 metres
  4.       Single-storey pole sheds and hay barns up to 110 square metres (but only in rural zones).

It’s important to note that any plumbing work to a new or current building still requires a building consent, and any electrical work will still have to be carried out by a registered electrician.  Different councils can also have different local by-laws but some, like Auckland Council, have a handy online tool to check if your shed needs consent 

For property owners, this has been welcome news, as it will save time and money when thinking about a new building or addition with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) predicting it will cut out the need for over 9000 consents and $18m worth of consent fees for homeowners.

However, it is also important to note that KiwiSpan is available to ensure that whatever your building size, shape or usage, that you will fully comply with the local council regulations before we commence building. Because KiwiSpan builds are entirely customised, we can give you a world of possibilities.

Whether it’s a shed, farm barn or carport, KiwiSpan has the solution for you.

Contact us HERE today to get the ball rolling on your next shed project. 

The A-Z’s of Sheds

The dictionary definition of a shed reads as simply “a structure on your property that isn’t connected to your home”. By that definition, the options of what a shed is, and what it can do for you is pretty limitless. 

With our customised approach, this is a pretty accurate description. We understand that everyone has different needs, and we pride ourselves on our ability to meet those needs, whatever they may be. 

However, sometimes, with such a wide range of capabilities and options, it can become harder to nail down exactly what you want (and therefore need) in a shed. So we’ve put together a rundown of the different basic categories of sheds to help you find a starting point for your next project. 

 

Storage Shed

For those of you that grew up with parents that had a humble shack in your garden to store gardening equipment – that was technically a storage shed (although nowadays we tend to think bigger). 

As the name implies, the purpose of these sheds is to, well, store things. The details of what specific features these sheds have will largely come down to what exactly it is you’ll be storing. 

However, regardless of what you put in them, these sheds need to be able to protect your stored goods and keep them in pristine condition (read how we protect your valuables from NZ’s harshest conditions here

 

Habitable

Another shed type that says what it does in the name – habitable sheds are sheds that can serve as short term accommodation or as an extra, detached bedroom for your main residence. 

These sheds can also be combined with other shed types (such as garages and workshops) to serve as an area to relax in between long hours on the workbench (read: mancave).   

 

Barn

We’ve all got an image of an old, red farmhouse when someone mentions the term “barn” (and we probably got it from a painting or childhood storybook).

Unsurprisingly, a barn has traditionally referred to a shed that is specifically for agricultural use. Their trademark shape and design actually come from this original usage, as they were built to accommodate for windy days and getting the most out of the passing sun. 

Nowadays, barns can be used for general storage, and their trademark design is more for show (as weather mitigating technology has advanced a bit). With their aesthetically pleasing appearance and spacious interior, they are a great general-purpose asset for storage and vehicle housing, as well as continuing to excel in their traditional agricultural usage.

 

Has this helped clear things up? You can always contact us for further info or to discuss your next project here.

It’s Now Easier to get a Barn (and Why You Should Consider it)

Hay there, have you heard the good news about barns? 

 

If not, we’d love to tell you about it.

Building a barn is now easier.

This used to be a bit of a process. It wasn’t just about finding land and building materials. You also had to acquire a building consent. This was a process that would take time, money, resources and require several permissions.

All this was before you can even think about building the thing. 

However, it’s been announced that single-story barns under 110m2 are now exempt from this requirement. Provided you stick to those specs, you’re good to go.

The only other catch is that you actually have to use the barn as a barn. So, as cool as converted barn bars/wedding venues/stores are, you’ll still need a building consent for this kind of work.  

But it’s worth noting that this exemption covers any sort of structure (enclosed, semi-enclosed or open) used for farming-related activities in rural areas, not just hay barns (despite the earlier pun). 

Okay, that’s great – but why should you care?

Well, despite the stereotypical idea of an old, red wooden building found on old-timey farms, modern sheds are actually an incredibly useful utility building with a range of valuable uses. KiwiSpan offers a wide range of custom barn solutions for a multitude of uses. 

 

Storing livestock

So using a barn as a place for keeping various animals is probably the most obvious one, but you don’t necessarily need to be a livestock farmer to make use of this.

Raising animals can not only be a profitable, and fun activity. Studies have also shown that raising children around animals can help with allergy immunities and self-confidence.

More and more people are choosing to raise chickens (scrambled eggs for breakfast anymore?), and for all the rider’s out there – barns can also serve well as a stable for horses as well.

Thanks to the recent influx of “cute cow playing with beach ball” videos online (Who would’ve thought that cats’ time in the spotlight was limited?), adopting a cow as a pet rather than a future meal has also become more popular in recent years. 

 

Actually, storing a lot of things.

If you have a larger property to maintain, then a barn is the perfect place to store some of your larger equipment, such as ride-on lawnmowers, without cluttering up the garage. 

KiwiSpan barns are also much more weather resistant and much more stylish than the old weighted tarpaulin solution too. In fact, even if you don’t have a fleet of farming machinery to keep out of the rain, a barn can make for a pretty solid storage option for any property, and it’s not all about work.

Barns provide plenty of storage for play too. Keeping your toys, as you can store quad bikes, cars and jet skis and boats 

 

Interested? Get in touch with us to see if your planned shed meets these requirements. Or feel free to browse our range of barns and other shed solutions here.